Meg Myers

 

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Meg Myers

In the final weeks of 2018, Meg Myers returned home from tour feeling lost and painfully out of touch with herself. Earlier that year, the Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist had released her sophomore effort Take Me to the Disco, a widely acclaimed body of work that lifted her mercurial form of alt-rock to a thrilling new level. But despite the album’s great success, Myers found herself overwhelmed by disconnection and depression, eventually verging on suicidal. “I wasn’t enjoying life at all; I was so burnt out and felt like I was making music for other people and not for myself,” Myers recalls. “It got to the point where I hit rock bottom and just wanted out.”
Instead of giving up, Myers followed her instinct toward self-salvation. She quit drinking, ended the toxic relationship she’d gotten caught up in, and soon experienced a spiritual breakthrough that would prove to be monumentally life-changing. “I came back to my house and meditated for three hours, and in that period of time I woke up,” says Myers. “Everything in me felt more alive, and I realized that I’m a co-creator, like all of us are: I’d been creating everything that’s happened to me, even though I wasn’t conscious of that. Once I had that realization, I started releasing all this weight that I’d been carrying my whole life, releasing limiting beliefs about myself and others—just clearing away everything that’s not who I truly am.” 
As her debut for Sumerian Records, Myers presents a powerfully charged two-EP project: Thank U 4 Taking Me 2 the Disco and I’d Like 2 Go Home Now. Though many of the songs were created with Christian “Leggy” Langdon (her main collaborator on Take Me to the Disco), Myers also recently teamed up with producers Dave Bassett (Neon Trees, Bishop Briggs) and Andy Park (Deep Sea Diver, Pedro The Lion), transforming several tracks by tapping into her newfound boldness and lucidity of vision. “In the past I’d often limited myself by thinking that there were certain structures I had to follow with my music,” she says. “Now I’m letting go of all that and letting myself explore new ways of creating, and it feels so freeing. I feel like a kid.” 
As she moves forward with the making of her upcoming album, Myers feels guided by a radiant clarity of purpose, a newly discovered understanding of her distinct role as an artist. “I’ve always been drawn to making music as a form of therapy, but until I had my awakening I didn’t fully grasp why I was doing it,” she says. “When I was able to step back and see my story from a higher perspective, I realized that everything I’ve gone through is part of my mission to do things differently and create something that helps others—especially the people who’ve experienced trauma and have this confusion about how to release it. I believe there’s so much healing potential in all of us, and now I feel empowered to help other people find that and learn how to let go.” 


  



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